Pushing Limits of New Knees

All information given is from the Wall Street Journal Article:

John Jeffries, a 49-year-old money manager in Dover, Mass., had hip-resurfacing surgery in 2008 and is now coaching his son’s basketball team and long-distance cycling.Many active middle-agers are wearing out their joints with marathons, triathlons, basketball and tennis and suffering osteoarthritis years earlier than previous generations. They’re also determined to stay active for many more years and not let pain or disability make them sedentary.To accommodate them, implant makers are working to build joints with longer-wearing materials, and surgeons are offering more options like partial knee replacements, hip resurfacing and minimally invasive procedures.

More younger people also need joint-replacement surgery due to obesity, and some orthopedists refer them for weight-loss surgery first to reduce complications later.Even the most fit patients face a long period of rehabilitation after surgery and may not be able to resume high-impact activities.”There is, to be honest, some irrational exuberance out there,” says Daniel Berry, chief of orthopedic surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and president of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. “People may be overly optimistic about what joint replacement can do for them.” Read More….